Concretesock News – Laing O’Rourke

Concretesock Laing

Browsing through Laing O’Rourke’s Annual Review 2015, I came across this interesting little snippet on page 80:

“We have successfully implemented ‘concrete socks’ on a number of projects. These fit over the ends of concrete wagon chutes and negate the need for wash-out facilities on site. This not only saves money but significantly reduces the risk of environmental incidents. We will now look to extend usage across the business”

A little birdie also tells me that 19 socks are also successfully in use by Lafarge to service a major ISG contract in Sinfin, Derby …

Looks like this brilliant but simple idea I’ve been writing about for a couple of years is finally finding it’s feet.

Earlier articles by me on Concretesocks:

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Concretesocks

ConcretesockConcretesocks are a simple (and patented!) idea – a tough fabric cover that fits securely over the end of the delivery chute of a concrete ready-mix lorry to stop materials dropping out onto the road as the lorry travels between the batching plant and site, and back again. To other road users, its benefits are just the same as vehicle sheets on any other delivery vehicle – it keeps the load secure, avoids debris harming vehicles and pedestrians, and prevents concrete spilling and setting on roads or washing into road drainage systems in wet weather.

To contractors. they open up a range of other possibilities, from simply giving greater environmental protection from washout residue spillage when returning to the batching plant to, if carefully assessed, not washing out lorries on site at all, but instead allowing them to return to the batching plant for washing out and refilling without risk to other road users.

By doing the latter, not only do contractors avoid all the practical and environmental risks of managing a concrete wash-out point on site, but batching plant operators have the opportunity to recover and reuse materials that would otherwise be lost as washout waste on site, making their own operations more resource efficient – a win-win all round.

(To visit the Concretesock website, click on the image above)

Volumetric concrete mixers

Utranazz mixerJust spotted this in The Construction Index, and thought it was worth a quick note. Not something completely new, but it looks like Utranazz and Elkins may have solved one of the biggest problems in this kind of concrete mixer – conveyor belt replacement – by developing a slide-out belt cassette.

Hopefully, if this proves to be practical, we may see more of this sort of unit on the road rather than traditional drum mixer deliveries, allowing exact quantities to be delivered, and part-load charges to be eliminated.

Concrete wash-out

The washing out of ready-mix concrete lorries on construction sites after delivery of each load is a common occurrence, normally being carried out in a designated “wash-out” area, or, on more crowded sites, into a purpose-built wash-out unit. This unit separates the solid materials from the washout water, and treats the separated water to reduce its alkalinity before discharge to a foul sewer under a trade effluent discharge consent. Whilst many sites accept this as the norm, it is not the only solution, nor in many cases, the most environmentally-friendly one.

The Environment Agency offers guidance how washwaters should be managed on site in their Regulatory Position Statement (“Managing concrete wash waters on construction sites: good practice and temporary discharges to ground or to surface waters“). In Appendix 1 (good practice guidance) the Agency clearly advise that “As far as possible concrete mixing or delivery lorries should return for washout to the batching plant with only chutes being washed out on site.” This is repeated in the EA’s “PPG6: Working at construction and demolition sites” which again states that ready-mix lorries should return to the batching plant for washing out. (Section 7, p.41: Essential pollution prevention).

Clearly, there are benefits to this approach for the contractor, who doesn’t have to allocate space and manage a washout point on site or the waste arising from its use, nor is there standing time for vehicles using (or waiting to use) the wash-out point on site. And, as the majority of mix design codes around the world permit a percentage (typically 5%) of suitable recovered materials to be used in subsequent concrete mixes, returning the 1% – 4% of concrete that remains in the drum after discharge to the plant appears to make economic sense for the batching plant too.

Steelfields washout reclaimerA recent press release by Hanson UK (11 September 2012) refers to two new concrete production facilities in Glasgow noting: “In addition, a water reclaimer allows returned materials and wash-out from trucks to be separated. The solids – mainly sand and aggregate – go back into stock for reuse and the water is filtered and pumped into the supply tanks.” Clearly, batching plants are increasingly prepared for this approach, and are making use of the returned materials, with batching and mixing plant manufacturers such as Steelfields offering wash-out reclaimers as standard equipment.

However, to make batching plant wash-out a workable solution, two conditions have to be met:

  1. The site has to be close enough to the batching plant to ensure that the lorry can return and wash-out (or reload with an identical mix) before the residual concrete starts to set. The rule of thumb to meet this condition is normally maximum 20 minutes return travel time between the plant and site. (But see also 7 March 2014 addendum at bottom!)

  2. The lorry has to be able to return to the batching plant without losing any of the concrete remaining in the drum or chute onto the public highway – hence the EA recommending that the chute is washed out on site.

The first of these is clearly dependent upon the relative location of the plant and site, and the traffic conditions between the two whilst deliveries are taking place. If the travel distance between the two is too long, there is nothing to be done – wagons must be washed out on site or the residue will begin to harden inside the drum.

Until recently, meeting the second condition has been more problematic, with returning lorries losing small but troublesome quantities of concrete onto the road, not only creating uneven road surfaces once set, but also the risk of cracked windscreens and damaged paintwork for other road users whilst still fresh – and consequent insurance claims for the ready-mix suppliers. To minimise this risk, the EA recommend washing out the chutes only before returning to the batching plant, but even this requires a wash-out point on site.

Concretesock montageToday, however, not even this is necessary, thanks to the development of  Concretesocks – simple inexpensive closures that fit over the end of the delivery chute before returning to the batching plant – sealing the end of the chute and completely eliminating the risk of loss of material on the roads. And, on fast turn-around sites, wash-out becomes unnecessary except at breaks as the vehicle can return and refill before the previous mix has begun to set – reducing waste and making more productive use of the delivery vehicle – and in doing so, reducing costs.

So, given that batching plants are increasingly able to reuse materials from washing out delivery mixers, and loss of materials on the roads no longer need be a concern, why are contractors still using (and paying for) concrete wash-out points, or even expensive washout plant, on construction sites close to batching plants?

7 March 2014: At the invitation of Karl Goff, the inventor of the Concretesock, I subsequently had an entertaining and enlightening chat with “Brian the Driver” who has been using this product every day for over 2 years now, and who happily “rolls for an hour” without washing out when returning the the batching plant, “feels naked” if he doesn’t have a sock on the chute when travelling on the roads – and typically gets an extra load a day in as he just reloads with the same mix without washing out at all … just once at the end of the day!

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